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Building a crypto-currency POS with an API.

Bitcoin Featureed Image

I’ve recently been working on a project to create a crypto-currency wallet and API for POS transactions. I won’t tell you which crypto-currency I’m working on publicly, but if you want to hire me for helping you to create a POS system, blockchain parser, or API. Please let me know. First off, I had to choose between two packages: Node.js driven bitcoin-insight-api, and python scripted bitcoin-abe. Both are available on GitHub. https://github.com/bitcoin-abe/bitcoin-abe https://github.com/bitpay/insight-api Although it seems that node.js is increasing in popularity everyday, and python is looked down on by some for it’s high-level syntax, I eventually decided to use bitcoin-abe for the time being with hopes of eventually modifying the insight app. My reasoning is as follows: insight is dependant on bitcore.js. Right now there is not much documentation out there on modifying bitcore to work with alt-coins. There docmentation even advises that the package is still in development…

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Although I’m new to security encryption techniques and do not have worlds of experience or experience under my belt, I’m constantly learning more. I’m also a regular listener of the podcast Security Now with Steve Gibson on the TWIT network. Last week, the podcast was Steve’s presentation of SQRL (pronounced “squirrel”), which attempts to solve security, privacy and usabilt issues regarding the age old computing paradigm of username / password account security. To a large degree it seems that Steve’s proposal takes from the SSH paradigm used for secure logging into remote servers; namely an asymetrical key pair. Not only does this allow the user to avoid remembering a laundry-list of usernames and passwords that need to be periodically changed for optimal security, but also improves user privacy by allowing some information about the user such as email address to be excluded from the requirements for a user account. Understandably,…

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Nodejs – Becoming a more important web-app package everyday

I’m now learning Nodejs. Here are some links to articles and tutorials on how to get started in nodejs. Express for nodejs tutorial This is a great tutirial for getting started with nodejs. It shows how to create a package.json file and install using npm from there. This is important as a fast, reliable, and reproducable way to get the nodejs packages you need all in one place. The tutorial continues to show how to set up nodejs to listen on localhost port and also how to set up a basic router and directory / file structure. http://codeforgeek.com/2014/06/express-nodejs-tutorial/ http://codeforgeek.com/2014/10/express-complete-tutorial-part-1/ Nodejs and PHP Good article on using nodejs with PHP. I love php and it’s great they are compatible. That allows me to only apply nodejs for scripting some APIs (for example Bitcoin) and still use PHP as my main engine for serving dynamic website content. http://strongloop.com/strongblog/node-js-php-get-started/

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Red Monk identifies hottest programming languages using GitHub

The most important programming languages is a concern. If you want to identify trends in web-app programming, web-stack, or even mobile, back-end etc., you need to forecast changes. This can allow you to make intelligent changes in selecting which language to apply to your projects. Here in January 2014 Red Monk uses GitHub repos to identify the most important languages out there right now. I’m sorry I didn’t see this until 2014 is almost over, however I believe it’s still relevant in 2015. Here is a quote from the Red Monk article itself: <quote>" While the appetite for up to date numbers is strong, the truth is that historically changes from snapshot to snapshot have been minimal. This is in part the justification for the shift from quarterly to bi-annual rankings. Although we snapshot the data approximately monthly, there is little perceived benefit to cranking out essentially the same numbers…

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Enjoy Android apps on Chromebooks?

Digitimes research Group has posted their forecast for chrome books in 2014. According to their expectations chrome book sales going strengthen in the next few years. James Kendrick at ZDNet also reported his expectation that chrome books will be able to use android apps back in January 2013. This is exciting proposition and not only completely logical but I would expect that chrome book sales completely depend on their ability to use android apps. Obviously the number of android apps, is high and help android smartphone due to network effects. Although a lot of your Java code can be reused if you’re to just repackage your app for Chrome OS, number of available apps on Chrome OS could instantly multiply without increasing developer workload. I think the experience of running an android app on Chrome OS would be suitable for the user, and would instantly increase the chrome OS network…

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TIOBE Index: December 2013

December Headline: Transact-SQL programming language of 2013? TIEBO will announce language of the year next month.   Transact-SQL is expected to increase after gaining +1.30% in one year.  I code in MySQL primarily.  Visual Basic .NET (+0.80%), JavaScript (+0.53%) and F# (+0.41%) round out the top group.  I’m currently in the midst of trying to brush up my anaemic Java programming experience with a Coursera.org course on Python Programming. From the TIOBE Site: As of this month we have published our new layout for the TIOBE index for the first time. Most important improvement is the interactive trend chart. You can hover over the trends and select/unselect languages. The next few weeks/months we will add all other functionality that is missing now. One other important change is that the sum of the ratings of all languages is now 100%. In the past the sum of the first 50 languages was…

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More about the CNT Disruption

The industry I have chosen to investigate, and claim will be a big disruption in the future – although it isn’t poised for market yet – is the carbon nanotube (CNT) processor. Carbon nano technology was highlighted as a disruptive technology in a May 2013 report from McKinsey Quarterly (Manyika, 2013). The reason I believe it will be disruptive is because carbon nano processors have the potential to be much more energy efficient and compact (per processing capacity) than silicon based transistors. The infamous Moore’s Law has accurately predicted the improvements of silicon based semiconductor technology since it was stated by Moore in 1965 (Moore, 1965). While 9nm silicon chips are manufactured today, the the inherent quantum limitations posed by silicon-based semiconductor technology threaten to cause the development pace to drop below Moore’s expected level of improvement by 2020 at the 7nm scale (Merritt, 2013). On the other hand, a…

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